Handy Tip for Fresh Lettuce

I’ve been using this handy process for about a year.  I sometimes forget during the hustle and bustle of putting away groceries and carrying on with the daily duties of life.  But I’m quickly reminded when I return to the crisper drawer days later to find limp lettuce.  What a disappointment!

Follow these steps and there will be a handy source of fresh, crisp lettuce that lasts 2 to 3 weeks:

Cold water bath for lettuce

First, run a sink of cold water.  Then separate the individual lettuce leaves and place into the water.  Swish the lettuce lightly to rinse away any dust.

Drain the lettuce on a towel

After rinsing the lettuce, pick out a few leaves at a time and shake them over the sink to remove the excess water from them.  Place them onto a dry, clean towel. I prefer an older cotton dish towel.
Drain the lettuce

Once all of the pieces have been rinsed, shaken and placed on the towel, drain the water from the sink, then pull up the ends of the towel to roll all of the lettuce to the center.

Wrap lettuce

Then softly wrap the ends of the towel to form a loose blanket around the lettuce.

Ready to use lettuce

Place the towel wrapped lettuce into your refrigerator crisper drawer.

This will keep lettuce fresh and crisp for two weeks, sometimes lasting up to three weeks.

Say goodbye to limp lettuce.

Dreamin’ Girl

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Partial Progress

It’s an oft-made mistake, to expect that a DIY construction project will be completed within the projected time frame.

And then there’s the extended time frame that occurs when said project goes on indefinite hold.

Definitely in limbo status, our kitchen project is now in its eighth month.  Since the kitchen has been extremely functional for the past five months, we’ve had no pressure to move it forward, along with little to no enthusiasm for the process.

But the project is nearly at the halfway mark, and it’s time to give an update ( since we’re beginning to feel compelled to get back to work):

This little portion of the project was an addition to the original plan.  The skillets had been planned for an under cabinet hanging mount installation (the corner is part of the unfinished business) in the corner cubby.

kitchen sink area

I was concerned about this plan, as I couldn’t satisfactorily determine the weight limits of the cabinet top I have planned.  I’d considered purchase of a wall mount iron rack to mount to the top of this window frame and I’d finally located a rack to match the measurements and was nearly ready to place my order.

kitchen skillet rack

Then it struck me that the best option for weight support would be between the two cabinets, with a closet rod for the rack.

kitchen skillet rack detail

A quick trip to the nearest hardware store and I’d found my skillet rack:  a metal closet rod, cut to the proper length, with closet rod mounts, and large (and hard to find) S-hooks with rubber tips for added safety.  The total cost was less than $40, with the S-hooks being the greater portion of the cost.  SCORE!

kitchen closed corner

In the corner cubby, I decided to pull one of the cabinet doors to leave an open cabinet.  I can’t decide if it’s a win, but it’s not been a loss.  Sometimes you just opt for so-so and call it good.  Seriously, it keeps the open cabinet door out of the work space and has spared a few head injuries.

Also, I installed the towel rack and utility rack.  The utility rack isn’t pretty, but it’s been one of the handiest options so far.  How nice to just grab what you need rather than opening a cabinet or drawer.

I’m not showing you the bottom portion of the corner, as that’s an incomplete part of the project.

kitchen open cabinet

Here’s the close-up of the open cabinet.  Part of the remaining project is to paint the cabinet interiors the pale green you see on the sink window sill.  It will add some depth and contrast.  In the meantime, this cabinet functions well and looks decent enough, with my obsessive use of glass containers.

kitchen end view

The impact is the new hardware and paint.  Hardware was chosen to match the faucet as I had no reason to change it out.

I chose a dark paint color for the bottom cabinets, trim and corner walls, to continue the dark line of the oven.  I chose a monochrome light color for the upper walls, trim,  and cabinets to give the illusion of space.

The floors will be dark laminate tile squares, while the ceiling will be white bead-board.

We opened the cabinet above the stove to allow easy access to cooking condiments, seasonings and spices.  The bonus is the exposed brick from an original stove chimney.  We’ll frame off the opening and give the brick a sealer coat to liven up the color.

dining room view

The dining room has returned to its normal state (and left with its own unfinished projects, lol).  We live here and it’s evident.

Here’s a quick summary of what we have left to complete in the kitchen:

  • Floor tiles and trim
  • Ceiling bead-board and trim
  • Interior cabinet paint
  • Frame off brick chimney
  • Install corner cubby counter top and shelving
  • Hang iron shelf over microwave cart
  • Create mini pantry in basement door cubby

There’s where we are, with a practical approach project and a work in progress kitchen.

Dreamin’ Girl